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with stefan pedrazzi about whether he believes there are any reasons to be optimistic about greece. >>> and whether volatility triggered by uncertainty over the fiscal cliff should be hear to stay. the fiscal cliff seems to be here to stay, at least. house speaker john boehner has scrapped the deal on plan b. boehner conceded last night he didn't have enough support from republicans to pass the bill which would raise taxes on households making more than $1 is million a year. the house is now in recess until the end of the year. the white house says the president's main priority now is to ensure taxes goes go up for 98% of americans and 97% of small businesses. for more on the tax, we're joined. talk about the cliff. you wake up to the news this morning. what do you make of it? what do you do now? >> i guess what's happening is there is more idealogical battling going on in the republican party than maybe was obvious a little while ago. our baseline view is they will strike a deal either down to the wire or early next year. growth next year will be quite weak. it has to be said that
from becoming greece. no more borrowing without addressing why we're in debt to begin with. that's where the real chance for change occurs, at the debt ceiling debate. >> we're joined now by ralph sill voe. it's christmas eve. do you have some plans to do? >> it's an austerity christmas, actually. just a couple friends getting together and a couple of friends getting together and having a nice meal. >> it is not an austerity christmas. >> it actually is. we haven't had the greatest year. everything we hoped would happen. we thought this economy was going to turn around at the summer period. >> ralph, if you take a look at the stock market concerns, the dax is up 20%. >> there will be plenty of alcohol to forget. >> do you think we're going to manage to see some type of a resolution on the fiscal cliff? we're seeing a lot of finger pointing now and hearing from both sides saying it's in the other side's interest to delay these negotiations. >> i've had conversations with people in new york and working on trade floors. what i've been told by them is there is a huge number of meetin
to talk about greece or not, whether i want to dive straight into the banking union and what chance have we possibly got of getting agreement. >> let's talk about greece, much more fun. no, greece we have to get out of the way. is the debt by back program going to be successful, everyone nds it will. we know that's the one little lynchpin on which everything else rests. so if it's not, the money will not flow, but everybody insists as when he headed into the euro group meeting yesterday that it will be successful. that's also what what we hear from the greeks. there's a bit of arm fwising, but it will probably go through. and then lo and behold ahead of the actual summit in the morning, they can sign up the check for the next greek installment also we hope. we're also closer to a little rescue package for cypress. spanish aid package for the banks is on track. so that was the working list last night. another thing on the to-do list. the head of the euro group confirmed last night that, no, i will not extend anything now, i will definitely leave as head of the euro group at the end of thi
't get. see if you can do better. it wouldn't take much. >>> greece's national bank euro bank alfa and perez says they need the money following disclosures by the lenders last week. greece is concerned that the 50 billion euros set aside for bank recapitalization will be enough to cover the shortfall. >>> and the italian treasury is holding its last debt sale of the year. traders are expecting to see solid demand for the paper after rome placed nearly 12 billion euros of shorted dated paper just yesterday. still, they warn investors could become more discerning in the new year especially as the italian electric tore ral race on thursday. italy expects to raise around 10 billion euros next year. less supply. we know there's still plenty of investor demand and no sign necessarily of re-ignited concern about the longer term health of these -- you could call them peripheral economies. >> no. things have really improved. it's all still down to the ecb's pledge to support these countries if they fulfill the conditions. especially in the case of italy. the country is fulfilling conditions
the wires. we have quite a bit of support for the euro because of the s.a.p. upgrade on greece and the situation over there. we'll see also the way the market is reacting. let's have a quick look at what the dax is doing. it's been perky, up 0.15%. trading toward the 7,665 level. >> patricia, this comes at a time when people have been focusing on the strength of the euro. as we're over the 1.32 level you mentioned, certainly member countries would like to see a weaker currency. but as long as the surveys hold consistent with strength in the german economy, we're not likely to see that weakening. >> no. absolutely. and the more we get over the entire question will the euro break up or not, as long as that happens we will have some more support in the euro which is not bad if you think about the quantitative easing we've seen in the eurozone and also inflation. that could be the counterpart of the equation, that we still have money being pumped into the economies wheroe ouausterity is going on. we have a little pullback possibly going forward when it comes to the euro. then again
risk at the moment? we'll keep giving greece money because we can't afford not to. we're still waiting maybe for the ecb to step in. what is the till rask? anything we didn't know about? >> lots of things we don't know. that's the problem. it is the unknown unknown as they say. i think greece is probably too small to view. i think what really bothers me is spain which i think clearly bothers the whole market. the question, a growth going to fall off a cliff or whether it muddle through and a bailout will be sufficient. as you say, we don't know the answer to that question. that remains the tail risk. until we do get close to a resolution, i'm not going to turn massively bullish. >> what's your view on that? >> i think i go along very much with what he's saying. >> what is your view on what happens to spanish growth? >> i think spain has a lot of problems at the moment. it's not seeing a lot in the domestic market. not seeing it move toward an export. in which case spanish growth is going to be very, very weak for some time to come. >> all right. good to see you. thanks very much. alan
. there is no argument there as there wasn't for greece. we know the countries, italy, greece is in a crisis and it's a crisis due to lack of competitiveness. going back to the currency, under the currency they create a wave of all sorts of problems including inflation and i think it is not a good route. >> well, i do rather agree with paula on this one. the problem with the euro is it gives you easy and quick solutions. and we're going to keep developing your currency. as you go back to the old days where you keep lowering your currency and you pay relatively high rates on your debt. so the appeal of the euro in the beginning was, oh, chief debt. it looked like christmas. now we're discovering that that regime, a ten-year regime where many peripheral countries got hammered. only germany sort of really held it together. now we have to look at how to undo this. for countries who have no ambition about their future, then maybe the policy is the way to go. italy had so many things going for it that falling back, that seems almost -- >> how about the service in the g-7. >> italy is two countries. it's
reached on the banking up. it's integrity is good for the agreement and as we focus on greece today, conditions are in place to disburse the next tranche of aid to greece totalling 43 billion euros. >>> over to japan, voters are heading to the poll on sunday. the major indicators suggest a win for the opposition party. the local media says there is still a large pool of undecided japanese voters. kari enjoji has more on this report from tokyo. >> reporter: 12 parties, some less than a month ole are fielding 1,504 candidates. but instead of being slow for choice, voters say i just don't know. polls suggest the prime minister's democratic party is unraveling, hinting that many first-time politicians that swept the party to a victory three years ago could be wiped out. >> it's quite possible that the cpj will sink from neing first or second but possibly to even third parties in japanese politics. >> the dpj's handling of the fukushima disaster and undelivered economic promises have alien ated many voters. if the liberal democratic party wins, shinzo abi could with the newest restoratio
, greece, portugal are likely to stay in recession for the whole year, i would argue there's a high probability that italy will come out of recession towards the end of the second quarter. >> and that seems to be the real concern that is in the market today, whether the political upheaval, even the campaigning by berlusconi could undo some of that progress. >> i think the key point is will the reform programs that have been initiated by the monte government, will they stay intact? i think there's a reasonable chance, they've had a more than reasonable chance that that is the case. yes, it's not surprising, we have the sell off today. it's inest knowledge that as the campaigning builds up, investors will be nervous.. the move by investors back into italian bonds over the next few months, we could see some exits. but i think if we get a sensible election results, and i think we probably will, then the reform program will be intact and the new government will stick to the budget that is going to be passed in the next two weeks. >> maybe a buying opportunity there. i won't quite put the
, but will be a couple points worse than greece and spain. so that's a big negative for george osbourne. another one will be getting the percentage of debt compared with gdp in the country, getting that down within a five-year period, getting it syncing in the right direction. he thought it was going to peek around 75%, 75%. it looks like it could go up even further. so let's see what he says on that front today. in terms of options, he has very few options indeed because this is a government which as we know has set its fallout on plan a. and yet, are we seeing real austerity? i'm not entirely sure. government borrowing this fiscal year so far in the five months that we have figures for already is 26.7% higher than the same period a year ago. the idea originally this year was for flat spending and then getting it down there after. and he's having to borrow more and more money, october figures were around 2.6 billion pounds more in borrowing than analysts expected. having to borrow more because tax receipts and corporations are falling. the labor party -- i was speaking to rachel reeves earlier on,
the various government actions. look at wages in greece and now spain. wages in greece are down more than 25%. very painful, but we've heard about the pain already. what we haven't heard so much about is the competitiveness. >> enor husband costs with incredibly high unemployment rates. >> that i'm afraid is what's going on and that's extremely unpleasant. what i'm saying in terms of market action is we know about that, we're focused already on the unemployment, we're not focused on the wage improvement in competitiveness. >> all right giles, more to come from you you. also we'll hear from the stars of les mis about why the classic story will resonate with the current economic climate. and later in the program, we'll also hear from the nigerian finance minister about the resources boom. but you what about the corruption issue. and we'll also hear first from apple's new ceo tim cook about steve jobs' legacy and his future plans for the tech giant. plus of course we'll continue to keep you updated on the reaction and the latest dealings from the earthquake in japan. >>> a 7.3 magnitude earthqu
of a break-up, notably let by a greece exit were too high, higher than keeping greece in. >> and who were some of the past winners? what in your point of view is the most important criteria for picking person of the year? what is this supposed to represent? >> it's an important contribution to innovation. we've had receive jobs, for example, as person of the year. we earlier, five years ago, we had picked shawn claude trichet, the then president of the european central bank because he led the central bank response in 2001. so i think it's someone who has made a decisive, positive contribution to economic policy, public policy and that is probably why we wouldn't choose the north korean lead, who just let up a north korean missile this week. >> are there any regrets over choosing trichet now? >> i don't think so. he played an important role. we think mr. draghi has been somewhat bolder in his approach, notably through the money transactions which are designed to intervene in the bond market to reduce spreads where, in effect, speculators are betting on a break up of the eurozone, which is
at the currency and isolation. >> steven, stay there. selling 1.3 billion euros in three-month t-bills for greece. the bid to cover ratio, 1.73%. this allocation did include a 30% noncompetitive tranche. in other central bank news, it's been quite a busy day on that front. the central bank says use the repo rate holing at this level in the coming year warning the recovery is taking its toll on the economy. >>> and in australia, the rba eps's decision to lower rates appears to find a close one. central banks included keeping the rates on hold. still, policymakers were more concerned by more than expected slowdown in mining and investment. and japan's prime minister elect has told the country's central bank to consider adopt ago 2% inflation target. shinzo abe made the claim today. the bank is expected to cut borrowing costs at its rate setting meeting this week. steven, in light of all of this news, kind of goes back to the point that we were just making, that are a lot of central banks trying to use interest rates effectively as a way to depress the value of their currency even though we're seein
can be a bit less worried about greece next year than we can be this year, for example, as well as in spain the government is considering a variety of reform efforts. indeed, despite the exchange in governments we had this year, it's the french deposit. when we look at it in aggregate, i think the tailwinds are starting to overcome the headwinds. the headwinds are still going to be there. the fiscal one is very important. there are still going to be risks on the european side. there's still the geopolitics which, of course, we can't ignore here. but in aggregate, i think those tailwinds are starting to get more traction and that's particularly becoming true in the u.s. housing market. >> what's interesting to that point is that we're coming to a year where even some of those concern are going away. central banks are starting to get extraordinarily accommodative. i wonder if their measures haven't been too back end loaded. certainly when you look at japan, it has pursued cycles earlier and had more impact. what about the sense ta whether it's the fed, whether it's the bank of jap
of its own. 7% like -- remember, the business is still majority in spain, italy, portugal, greece, et cetera. over 50% of sales. there 7% like for like. margins rising. it is a special company. >> taking a big -- are they taking a chunk of market share, as well? >> absolutely. i think it goes back to the strengths of its model. i think more than anyone else they listen to the consumer. this is fast fashion taken to the extreme. there's something new in the stores every two weeks. there's a reason to keep going every two weeks. they get feedback from the store managers quickly on what's working, what's not working. go back to the production people, say we need this more, we need less of this. >> the supply chain must be -- where are they making this stuff? how are they able to get it into the store so quick three is. >> about half of their production is in spain, portugal, and morocco. that's the secret really. unlike h&m et cetera who gave everything to the far east, inditex is doing quite a lot locally. that is the key challenge for them. as they get bigger and bigger, can they remai
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15

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